All posts by Dawn Heinen

4 Mass Programs Named Finalists for 2017 NAHYP Awards

Young people work on a photo shoot for Shakespeare Inside and Out, a program of Actors' Shakespeare Project, Somerville, MA.The President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities and its cultural partners – the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services – are proud to recognize 50 outstanding programs in the field of Creative Youth Development across the country for their work in providing excellent arts and humanities learning opportunities to young people. From big cities to small towns, the 2017 National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award Finalists reflect the diversity of disciplines and settings of these exceptional creative youth development programs that are taking place from coast to coast.

Congratulations to the Massachusetts programs named as finalists for 2017:

Codman Academy Summer Shakespeare Institute
Huntington Theatre Company, Inc., Boston

New Bedford Whaling Museum High School Apprenticeship Program
Old Dartmouth Historical Society, New Bedford

RAISE (Responding to Art Involves Self Expression)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown

Shakespeare Inside and Out
Actors’ Shakespeare Project, Somerville

Podcast: Empowering Youth to Fix the World Around Them

Priscilla Kane HellwegOn the Mass Cultural Council’s podcast, Creative Minds Out Loud, we spoke with Priscilla Kane Hellweg, Executive Director of Enchanted Circle Theater.

Enchanted Circle Theater is a community-based arts organization in Holyoke, MA, that works with students, teachers, and social services – in the mental health field, in the foster care world, everywhere and anywhere – using theater arts as a dynamic teaching tool. Hellweg says they’re developing whole human beings, who can think creatively, act creatively, and solve problems creatively.

Listen to the episode.

Read the transcript.

Check out other episodes featuring Creative Youth Development leaders.

Nano-Interview with Marielisa Alvarez of Boston String Academy

Marielisa AlvarezName: Marielisa Alvarez
Organization: Boston String Academy
Title: Co-Director
Music Genre: Classical
Years in the Field: 15

What do you do at Boston String Academy?
I am Co-Director and Co-Founder of the organization along with my twin sister, Mariesther, and my friend and colleague Taide Prieto. I teach violin and viola in individual and group settings, and lead string ensembles for about 110 children ages 6 – 15 in three different sites around the city –  Chinatown, Allston, and Roxbury. Aside from my teaching duties, I also spend part of the day doing administrative work, class and event planning, fund-raising, marketing, etc.

Why do you do what you do?
I had the life changing experience of growing up in El Sistema in my home country of Venezuela and I would like many children to have similar experiences of growing and learning through music. I want to help them open their eyes to a world of possibilities and opportunities.

What comes easiest to you in this work?
I love what I am doing, and it comes very easy and natural to teach my students. I feel I can easily communicate and transmit my passion and excitement to them and they respond very well.

What challenges you in this work?
Not having enough time to do everything I would like to do. Finding resources to support  our vision and being able to offer this opportunity to many more children.

What does it mean to your community that you do this work?
Many children are having access to top quality classical music training that they otherwise would not be able to. The children are being exposed to sublime artistic impressions, they will become more sensitive, they will appreciate art, they will be able to interact and work well with others, they will be more confident and have the courage to reach higher in life, they will become well rounded human beings, and the best ambassadors and advocates for their families and communities.

How do you blow off steam?
Outdoor activities and dancing!

What do you create in your free time?
Tasty dishes

Seen any good movies lately?
Hidden Figures

What’s next?
Europe! Will be going to Finland this summer to the second phase of the amazing Colourstrings pedagogy workshop, and will visit some El Sistema-inspired programs in Europe as well.

Nano-Interview with Olga Marchenko of BalletRox

Olga MarchenkoName: Olga Marchenko
Organization: BalletRox
Title: Program Manager, Ballet Instructor
Artistic Genre: Dance
Years in the Field: 8

 

What do you do at BalletRox?
I am responsible for different aspects of BalletRox program, inclusive but not limited to curriculum design, student enrollment, student and program evaluation, production of recitals, and website development. As a ballet instructor I teach all levels ballet classes and choreograph for recitals and performances.

Why do you do what you do?
The mission of BalletRox organization is dear to my heart with its main objective to provide to expose Boston youth to dance and opportunities for mastery and performance, to which they would not otherwise have access, giving them discipline and a supportive community to succeed in life.

What comes easiest to you in this work?
Communication with students, especially our oldest group (12-18 years old). I believe in partnership between a student and a teacher, where I see myself more of an older friend, who knows just a bit more and likes to share her experiences with my younger friends. In turn, they know that there is a time for fun sometime but when there is a work to do they become professionals and work their hardest!

How do you blow off steam?
For me it is taking a simple walk in the park or forest on a sunny day does it. Having music on a background comes second to it. And of course, reading.

What music do you like listen to (if even a little too loudly)?
I’m an oldies person most of the time. Anything from Billie Holiday to the Beach Boys. At times however, could sway from hip hop to classical and somewhere in the middle with some lounge music.

What are you currently reading?
Life Without Limits by Nick Vujicic. A very inspirational autobiographical book about a person born without limbs, neither legs nor arms. Despite his physical limits he does not only lead a full life but encourages others to not give up hope in any circumstances.

Podcast: Youth Finding a Voice, Finding a Stage

Julie BoydOn the Mass Cultural Council’s podcast, Creative Minds Out Loud, we spoke with Artistic Director Julie Boyd.

Through Barrington Stage Company’s creative youth development program, Playwright Mentoring Project, theatre is used as a catalyst to help under-served youth learn skills to aid them in developing positive self-images. Boyd speaks to the cathartic nature of this work and to how their programs in education and theatre-making interweave.

Listen to the episode.

Read the transcript.

Check out other episodes featuring Creative Youth Development leaders.

2017 Creative Youth Development Webinar Series

The Creative Youth Development National Partnership is producing a year-long webinar series designed to increase understanding of CYD practice, build capacity, and advance the field.

The first three webinars are focused on CYD fundamentals. In the months ahead, we’ll be adding to this exciting line-up with deeper dives into the five imperatives of the CYD national policy agenda, including webinars on cross-sector collaboration, documenting and communicating impact, promoting youth leadership, and more.

Creative Youth Development: What’s in a Name?
Wednesday, April 5, 1 – 2:30pm ET

Five Effective Models of Creative Youth Development Practice
Monday, April 24, 1 – 2:30pm ET

Youth Development in the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities
Thursday, April 27, 4 – 5:30pm ET

Register for these free sessions and learn more.

Nano-Interview with Ian Gollub of Global Learning Charter Public School

Ian GollubName: Ian Gollub
Organization: Global Learning Charter Public School and Jazz Initiative
Title: Music Director
Music Genre: Trained in Jazz
Years in the Field: 13

What do you do at Global Learning Charter Public School and the Jazz Initiative?
I am the Music Director and General Music Educator for the entire program 5-12. I teach Middle School and High School Band, Jazz Band, Jazz Combo, and general music grades 5-8. Four years ago we had a non-existent performance program. Now nearly 1/3 of the entire school participates in a performing ensemble, band, chorus, or orchestra.

I built the Global Learning Charter Jazz Initiative (GLCJI) based on a similar model program I began in Newport, RI, and it was my hope the GLCJI would be the perfect space for young people to begin their musical journeys without worry about cost or instruments.

The GLCJI offers a safe space, instruments, tools, and serious instruction to young musicians who want to learn, explore, create, and promote jazz music and beyond. We offer ensemble and performance based curriculum free to students grades 3-12 in New Bedford, MA and the surrounding communities.

Why do you do what you do?
Having the opportunity to play music all day – all night – everyday is not a job, it’s a gift. I am grateful that I earn a living doing what I love. Growing up, I was fortunate enough to have the means and support to pursue my dreams of performing. I was able to study privately and attend great music workshops and programs. I also grew up knowing that, although I was fortunate enough to have such an opportunity, not everyone was as lucky.

I knew from the second I began teaching that, as often as possible, I wanted to create and promote music education opportunities at little or no cost to students. Many young people have a great desire to study and perform, and the only thing keeping them from sharing their musical energy and ideas is financial burden, distance to programming, and lack of resources (mainly instruments).

What comes easiest to you in this work?
Generating excitement for being musical comes easiest. I think this is only because I am so genuinely excited myself. I like to think my passion and excitement is infectious to my students and rubs off a bit.

What challenges you in this work?
Scheduling, time, and space are the main challenges. Currently our facility is a very charming and beautiful, but 100-year old former Catholic school building. Not much has changed in 100 years. Classrooms are small and definitely not designed for rehearsing ensembles. Sharing this space with other programming in the Global Learning Charter Public School community gets tricky. Fortunately, our program is respected and supported by administration, staff, and community therefore we don’t run into much trouble. Never having enough time is something there doesn’t seem to be a cure for!

What does it mean to your community that you do this work?
There is an incredible amount of musical energy, musical ideas, and genuine enthusiastic creativity found in our neighborhoods of Greater New Bedford. For that reason, the intent is to create a safe space and the means and tools for these young people to learn, create, and promote their music. It is not the lack of desire, but largely the lack of financial resources that discourages youth from learning to play a musical instrument and participating in a music program. Having opportunities like this in our community has been embraced.

How do you blow off steam?
I love playing and being silly with my 4 year-old and 2 year-old. Who doesn’t wish they could go back in time to when there wasn’t a care in the world and playing make-believe was some serious work?!

What music do you like listen to (if even a little too loudly)?
Tower of Power, Earth Wind and Fire, Steely Dan, Coltrane, Miles and Bird are my regular rotation.

Springfield’s SciTech Band Receives 2017 Commonwealth Award

Last month, the MCC proudly presented Springfield’s SciTech High School Band with the 2017 Commonwealth Award in Creative Youth Development, for providing Springfield’s youth with opportunities to experience music and to give back to their community by sharing their joy in its creation.

Their energetic performance kicked-off the State House ceremony:

MCC’s biennial Commonwealth Awards celebrate exceptional achievements in the arts, humanities, and sciences. The creative youth development category recognizes an individual, school, or cultural organization that has successfully helped young people develop their creative potential, foster critical learning and life skills, & become active contributors to their communities.